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Brakeing Down Security podcast

A podcast all about the world of Security, Privacy, Compliance, and Regulatory issues that arise in today's workplace. Co-hosts Bryan Brake, Brian Boettcher, and Amanda Berlin teach concepts that aspiring Information Security Professionals need to know, or refresh the memories of the seasoned veterans.
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Now displaying: February, 2015
Feb 28, 2015

Mr. Boettcher got a hold of the developers and maintainers of the anonymizing network "I2P". We talked with "str4d" and "Jeff" this week.

In Part 1 of the interview, we discuss the technical aspects of I2P, how it functions, how 'Garlic routing' works, and how the flood Fill servers allow for I2P to function effectively.

In the final segment, we discuss form factors, specifically if I2P is available for embedded systems like Raspberry Pi.

If you find Tor not to your liking, give I2P a try... it's goals are the same, but the method of security and privacy are different. Plus, as you can hear from the podcast, it's very much a tight knit community of security and privacy enthusiasts.

 

Show notes, links, and contact info: 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Vh0HiUDXchesI2-BlthztoIIswZa0GZa_Jg0mOu0ao4/edit?usp=sharing

Feb 21, 2015

The second part of our interview with Pawel discussed Content management systems, and how you can integrate CSP in Drupal, Django, and the like.

Content managers, you'll want to listen to this, especially about how CSP can help you secure the content on your systems, as well as protect customers from web based attacks using the sandboxing functions of CSP

Pawel's Blog = ipsec.pl

Pawel's CSP builder app = cspbuilder.info

Quick Guide to CSP: http://content-security-policy.com/

 

 

Feb 16, 2015

Pawel Krawczyk did an interview with us about Content Security Policy. Learn about what it is, and whether or not the latest browsers can support it.

 

We also talk about how you can get around it, if there are ways to avoid it if you are a bad guy, and how you can get the most out of it.

If you're a web developer, and want to reduce your site's chances of allowing XSS, you'll want to take a listen to this.

 

https://w3c.github.io/webappsec/specs/content-security-policy/#changes-from-level-1

https://w3c.github.io/webappsec/specs/content-security-policy/#directive-sandbox

Feb 10, 2015

Extra special treat this week!  We do a continuation of our review of the Top 20 Security Controls, in which we do #14 and #15, which all of you will find very interesting.

 

But the real reason we are posting this today is the Call for Papers and Call for Mentors for the Bsides Las Vegas Proving Grounds! We invited Magen Wu (@tottenkoph) on to discuss. If you've ever asked yourself "I'd like to give a talk, but they'd never put me on"  NOW IS YOUR CHANCE! :)

This is a great opportunity if you're a veteran speaker, or just want to give back to the community at large... You can mentor a n00b to help them create a topic, help them hone their paper, and be with them when they give the talk at Bsides Las Vegas in July.  

Many thanks to @tottenkoph and @securitymoey. They need your help, both as a mentor and a mentee.  This is also an excellent networking opportunity. You get 1-on-1 access to an often influential mentor, someone in the infosec community, and your talk will be seen by several hundred people. hmmm.... maybe I should put one in :D

 

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SANS #14-10: 

Ensure that the log collection system does not lose events during peak activity, and that the system detects and alerts if event loss occurs (such as when volume exceeds the capacity of a log collection system). This includes ensuring that the log collection system can accommodate intermittent or restricted-bandwidth connectivity through the use of handshaking / flow control.

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"Dirty Rhodes" created by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) 
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Feb 7, 2015

During our research with Lee Brotherston, who we had on last week for our podcast on threat modeling, we got to listen to one of his talks about how his ISP in Canada was actively doing a Man-in-Middle injection of a banner into sites that he visited.  

 

We were intrigued, and also gobsmacked (I can say that, right?) about the brashness of an ISP not apparently understanding the security implications of this, so we had him back on totalk about the finer points of his research.  The bad news? Other ISPs, including American ISPs are using this technology.

 

This is one of those podcasts that you need to tell your friends about, cause it's truly surprising the lengths ISPs go to injecting content into your pages.

 We also have a short message about the Bsides Las Vegas Proving Grounds this year... If you've wanted to present a paper at a conference, and have a mentor guide you through the process, hit them up on the Proving Grounds page at http://www.bsideslv.com

Show notes (lots of info): https://docs.google.com/document/d/1YLkiRE1SVIyWquWc-iQrESWlT10rSJmW1VcrOX3kQZ0/edit?usp=sharing 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

"Dirty Rhodes" created by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) 
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Feb 1, 2015

Threat Modeling... ranks right up there with Risk Assessments in importance...  You gotta figure out how the applications you're creating or the systems you're engineering are secure.  It really takes knowing your application and really, knowing the enemies/factors that can cause your application to fail, from santizing inputs on a web app, to making sure that your code doesn't have use-after-free bugs.

Brakeing Down Security talked about conducting threat modeling and application reviews with Lee Brotherston (@synackpse) from Leviathan Security (@LeviathanSecurity) this week. We discuss types of risk analysis, including one named 'Binary Risk Analysis', which may simplify assessment of your computer systems.  

 

Show notes = https://docs.google.com/document/d/1K-eycek2Xud7loVC4yrHg6eHCY0oyztV_ytbY433oYk/edit?usp=sharing

 

 

 

"Dirty Rhodes" created by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) 
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

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